L.A. Considers Periodically Closing 6th Street Bridge To Traffic


The 6th Street Bridge may intermittently close to thru traffic as the L.A. City Council weighs its options against vandalism and stunts.

While LAPD can often be seen at just a stone’s throw from either side of the bridge, the council is seeking a more long-term solution for keeping the bridge and others safe.

The remodeled bridge held a grand opening on July 9 and since then multiple viral incidents have occurred, from a car burning out and crashing into a side barrier, to people climbing the pillars for stunts.

Councilman Kevin de Leon, who represents the 14th district of Los Angeles where the bridge resides, presented two motions on August 19, asking the City Administrative Officer to explore safety options and how much they would cost.

“The city does not have city staff or a contractor whose job it is to maintain bridges in the city,” de Leon wrote in the motion. “A sustainable maintenance plan is needed so that the bridge stays in excellent condition for all of its users and to minimize the amount of work an individual permittee will need to do in order to use the bridge.”

Aside from closing it off to vehicles, the city may install surveillance cameras, anti-climbing architecture, or rumble strips on the road to deter high speeds from drivers.

If closures were to occur, the bridge would still be open to pedestrians.

The bridge has seen recent closures, as the city has scrambled to reduce the amount of illegal activity, and in those times, pedestrians have taken advantage, freely walking, biking and even riding scooters across without a vehicle presence.

The motions were passed by the city council, giving the Board of Public Works 30 days to report back with costs to keep vandalism and graffiti at bay, as well as maintenance charges for anyone using the bridge for filming or special events.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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