The Three Pillars of High-Level Sales and a Successful Life, According to Jay Austin


The world’s most successful billionaires often attribute their success to habits, mindsets, and philosophies. From Warren Buffet’s “500 pages per day” suggestion to Steve Jobs’s advocacy for meditation and mindfulness, business advice commonly takes the form of personal and motivational advice that some may quickly dismiss as patronizing.

More than a case of businessmen trying to protect their trade secrets, however, studies have shown that mindset, creativity, and intention are more strongly linked to entrepreneurial success than any specific set of skills or strategies.

The 25-year-old Jay Austin is living proof of this. Despite his young age, Austin became one of the industry’s most successful sales and marketing experts by fully committing to a personal development journey.

Here, he talks about his three pillars of personal growth and his unique take on the three steps of sales success.

It began with a leap of faith

Austin started his entrepreneurial journey with a leap of faith. He dropped out of his last year at university and used his savings to pursue personal development.

“I actually spent 15 years of my life dedicating myself to this dream of being a professional athlete,” Austin says. “I was a football star for much of my school life, and I went to university with a full-ride division one scholarship. But all of a sudden, I just realized, ‘Hey, this isn’t going to work out.’ and I made the decision to drop all of it in a very small amount of time. I made that decision and committed to it. Now, years later, here we are.”

Jay Austin’s Three Pillars

Today, Jay is a highly-successful entrepreneur with multiple 7- and 8-figure companies under his belt. An expert in building sales systems and teams for online and in-person sales, Jay has closed over $3 million in online sales in the last four years.

The Jay Austin playbook can be summarized through his approach to the three stages of sales: acquisition, communication, and conclusion.

“The very first part of sales is acquisition.” shares Jay. “You want eyes on you and your business, and you should first ask how you will acquire this interest. If you build an effective channel, especially with multiple acquisition channels, you’ll be on track to growing your business quickly.”

“This is followed by communication, and someone in sales should remember that communication is a two-way street. You should not only be able to communicate your ideas, products, and strategies to the customer but also let the customer communicate what they need. I also advocate for going one-level deeper than just finding customer ‘pain points’ but fleshing out their motives behind these points.”

“The last and perhaps most important part is the conclusion, and I believe here it pays to be persuasive but in a way that’s straightforward and transparent. One of our mottos is that “We don’t find buyers, we create buyers,” and sticking the landing with customers is essential to creating lifelong buyers.”

To lead aspiring individuals to their own entrepreneurial journeys, Jay Austin now relays his learnings and experiences through a coaching program developed with his partner, Terrence Kruse. Here, Jay teaches others not only the pillars for scaling sales and businesses but also more personal guidance that teaches them how to scale their lives.

“What I’ve learned from business is that one little piece of information could be the difference between making five figures and making six, seven, maybe eight figures,” he says. “I believe this is the case also in life, and I want to give others the best chance they can have.”

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